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 ABOUT REST MINISTRIES -
 FOUNDER/SPONSOR OF NICIAW
  • Visit our web site and see a DVD about Rest Ministries.
  • FOUNDING INFO: Rest Ministries was established in 1997 and incorporated in 1998, as a 501[c](3); founded by Lisa Copen who has lived with rheumatoid arthritis since the age of 24 (diagnosed in 1993). Lisa was diagnosed with fibromyalgia in 1998.
  • FAITH: Rest Ministries is a nonprofit, non-denominational Christian organization.
  • LOCATION OF OFFICE: San Diego, CA
  • HOW WE SERVE: Rest Ministries currently serves individual through 175 support groups called HopeKeepers, based within churches and communities in 30 states. Approximately 2500 people receive the Rest Ministries devotional via email every morning from Rest Ministries. Additional programs/outreach include The Encouragement Club, online communities such as Share & Prayer (men and women with chronic illness), Just Men (Christian men with chronic illness), Beyond Surviving Homeschooling, Splashes of Joy (women with chronic illness & depression), message boards, Bible study chats and much more.
  • SOURCE OF SUPPORT: Rest Ministries does not charge for any services. Resources, such as books and tapes are reasonably priced for those on a limited income. Rest Ministries is supported by donations and revenue from resource sales. They are currently seeking grant funding and church support.
  • VOLUNTEERS: Rest Ministries volunteers, nearly all of whom have at least one chronic illness, donate over 2000 hours per month. To volunteer, call 888-751-7378.
  • ABOUT OUR NAME: Rest Ministries is based on the verse Matthew 11:28, "Come to me all who are weary and burdened and I will give you rest."
Fact Sheet and Statistics
About Chronic Illness


Despite the fact that the majority of the US population looks rather healthy, statistics show a different story. Nearly 1 in 2 people have a chronic condition. This could be an illness like cancer or rheumatoid arthritis, or a condition such as arthritis, migranes or back pain from a car accident.

When studies are done about people with illnesses and disabilities, those who deal with chronic pain on a regular basis, but have not yet been diagnsed are often overlooked. We hope these chronic illess and invisible illness facts will shed some light on why we feel this week is valuable and worthy to inform others about.

  • Nearly 1 in 2 Americans (133 million) has a chronic condition
    Chronic Care in America: A 21st Century Challenge, a study of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation & Partnership for Solutions: Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (September 2004 Update). "Chronic Conditions: Making the Case for Ongoing Care".

  • By 2020, about 157 million Americans will be afflicted by chronic illnesses, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

  • That number is projected to increase by more than one percent per year by 2030, resulting in an estimated chronically ill population of 171 million.
    Chronic Care in America: A 21st Century Challenge, a study of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation & Partnership for Solutions: Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (September 2004 Update). "Chronic Conditions: Making the Case for Ongoing Care".

  • 96% of them live with an illness that is invisible. These people do no use a cane or any assistive device and may look perfectly healthy.
    2002 US Census Bureau

  • Sixty percent are between the ages of 18 and 64
    Chronic Care in America: A 21st Century Challenge, a study of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

  • 90% of seniors have at least one chronic disease and 77% have two or more chronic diseases
    The Growing Burden of Chronic Disease in American, Public Heal Reports / May–June 2004 / Volume 119, Gerard Anderson, PhD

  • 9 million people are cancer survivors with various side effects from treatment
    American Cancer Society

  • The divorce rate among the chronically ill is over 75 percent
    National Health Interview Survey

  • Depression is 15-20% higher for the chronically ill than for the average person
    Rifkin, A. "Depression in Physically Ill Patients," Postgraduate Medicine (9-92) 147-154.

  • However, the significance of one's faith has shown to lower one's risk of depressive symptoms and aid one in better handling a stressful medical event.
    Pressman P., Lyons J.S., Larson D.B., Strain, J.J. "Religious belief, depression, and ambulation status in elderly women with broken hips." American Journal of Psychiatry 1990; 147(6): 758-760.

  • Various studies have reported that physical illness or uncontrollable physical pain are major factors in up to 70% of suicides;
    Mackenzie TB, Popkin MK: "Suicide in the medical patient.". Intl J Psych in Med 17:3-22, 1987

  • and more than 50% of these suicidal patients were under 35 years of age
    Michalon M: La psychiatrie de consultation-liaison: une etude prospective en milieu hospitalier general. Can J Psychiatry (In French) 38:168-174,1993

  • About one in four adults suffer from a diagnosable mental disorder in a given year;
    Kessler RC, Chiu WT, Demler O, Walters EE. Prevalence, severity, and comorbidity of twelve-month DSM-IV disorders in the National Comorbidity Survey Replication (NCS-R). Archives of General Psychiatry, 2005 Jun;62(6):617-27.

  • and more than 90 percent of people who kill themselves have a diagnosable mental disorder
    Conwell Y, Brent D. Suicide and aging I: patterns of psychiatric diagnosis. International Psychogeriatrics, 1995; 7(2): 149-64.

  • Four in five health care dollars (78%) are spent on behalf of people with chronic conditions
    The Growing Burden of Chronic Disease in American, Public Health Reports, MayJune 2004 Volume 119 Gerard Anderson, PhD

  • Those who use their religious faith to cope are significantly less depressed, even when taking into account the severity of their physical illness. In fact, the clinical effects of religious coping showed the strongest benefit among those with severe physical disability. Some 87 patients hospitalized with serious illness who also then suffered depression were followed over time in another study. The patients with a deep, internalized faith recovered faster from the depression, even when their physical condition wasn't improving.
    Kendler, K.S., Gardner, C. O., and Prescott, C.A. "Religion, Psychopathology, and Substance Use and Abuse: A Multimeasure, Genetic-Epidemiologic Study," American Journal of Psychiatry 1997; 154: 322-329. Koenig, Harold G., Larson, David B., and Weaver, Andrew J. "Research on Religion and Serious Mental Illness," in Spirituality and Religion in Recovery from Mental Illness, ed., Roger Fallott. New Directions for Mental Health Services 1998; (80).



Over 100 million people in the U.S. have a chronic illness; 20.6 percent of the population, about 54 million people, have some level of disability; 9.9 percent or 26 million people had a severe disability….1.8 million used a wheelchair….5.2 million used a cane, crutches, or a walker… (U.S. Department of Commerce, 1997, p. 1). So that is less than 6% who have a visible illness.


Notably, 26 million persons were considered to have a severe disability; yet, only 7 million persons used a visible device for mobility. Thus, 19 million of the people who were defined as severely disabled, did not use a wheelchair, cane, crutches or walkers. In other words, 73% of Americans with severe disabilities do not use such devices. Therefore, a disability cannot be determined solely on whether or not a person uses visible assistive equipment.

U.S. Department of Commerce (1994). Bureau of the Census, Statistical Brief: Americans With Disabilities. (Publication SB/94-1).U.S. Department of Commerce (1997). Bureau of the Census, Census Brief: Disabilities Affect One-Fifth of All Americans. (Publication CENBR/97-5).

U.S. Department of Commerce (1997). Census Bureau: Current Population Reports. (Publication P70-61). Author: John McNeill

 

  58% of those who found the internet to be crucial or important during a loved one’s recent health crisis say the single most important source of information was something they found online. * Pew Internet and American Life


You might try Nat. Ctr for Health Stats http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/
Census Bureau http://www.census.gov/
Center for Research on CI http://www.unc.edu/depts/crci/

Globalhealthfacts.org provides facts and figures about diseases pervading the world population, including AIDS, malaria and TB. Get information and stats broken down by disease or by region. Great information about some of the most serious health conditions in the world today.


Chronic Illness Often a Taboo Subject: Survey

October 11, 2007 08:40:42 PM PST

THURSDAY, Oct. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Along with taboo topics such as politics and religion, many Americans are reluctant to discuss managing a chronic illness with family or friends, according to a new survey of more than 1,000 adults.

The survey, released Oct. 11, found that 82 percent of respondents said they knew someone with a chronic illness, but only 34 percent were likely to suggest ways for this person to better manage their care. That's about the same number who said they'd debate politics (37 percent) or religion (33 percent) with a loved one or friend.

Respondents were more likely to discourage friends or loved ones from buying the wrong house (65 percent), loan them a large amount of money (56 percent), advise them against taking a job they didn't think was right for the person (48 percent), and tell them their spouse was unfaithful (41 percent).

The survey was released by Evercare, a provider of health plans for people who have chronic illnesses, are older, or have disabilities.

The reasons why many Americans are reluctant to offer advice to chronically-ill friends or family include:

  1. They think the person has the situation under control (66 percent); they are not a health care professional (31 percent)
  2. they don't want to seem like a nag (31 percent) or rude (29 percent)
  3. they don't believe the person would listen to them (27 percent)
  4. they didn't think the matter was that important (15 percent).

Other findings:

  • Twenty percent of respondents said their spouse was the easiest person to give advice to about health, followed by a child (20 percent), mother (13 percent), and father (5 percent).

  • Most respondents said they'd prefer to receive advice about managing a chronic illness from a health care professional (67 percent), followed by a spouse (10 percent) or parent (7 percent). Men were twice as likely as women (14 percent versus 7 percent) to have their spouse give them such advice.

  • Men have an easier time offering health advice to their spouse (28 percent) than women (19 percent). Women have an easier time offering health advice to their children (24 percent) than men (16 percent).

  • Thirty-four percent of respondents said the person closest to them with a chronic illness is a parent (34 percent), followed by another relative (16 percent), spouse (14 percent), friend (11 percent), sibling (8 percent), and child (6 percent).


Evercare offered tips on how to help family or friends with a chronic illness:

  • Talk to them in order to get an understanding of their goals. Get the conversation started by discussing events or activities they used to enjoy or future events they want to be part of, such as a family reunion. Once you understand their goals, you can help them achieve them along with health care providers, doctors or community service agencies.
  • Appoint an "ambassador" -- someone your friend or loved one feels comfortable talking with and respects enough to heed his or her advice. This person can help your friend or family member manage their condition.
  • Increase your comfort levels by educating yourself about the person's chronic illness. This will make you feel more comfortable speaking with them about the condition and reinforcing the advice the patient has received from their doctors.


Other invisible illness resources of interest:

 


SOURCES:

(Chronic Care in America: A 21st Century Challenge, a study of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.), American Cancer Society.
ibid.
National Health Interview Survey
Rifkin, A. "Depression in Physically Ill Patients," Postgraduate Medicine (9-92) 147-154.
Pressman P., Lyons J.S., Larson D.B., Strain, J.J. "Religious belief, depression, and ambulation status in elderly women with broken hips." American Journal of Psychiatry 1990; 147(6): 758-760.
Mackenzie TB, Popkin MK: "Suicide in the medical patient.". Intl J Psych in Med 17:3-22, 1987
Michalon M: La psychiatrie de consultation-liaison: une etude prospective en milieu hospitalier general. Can J Psychiatry (In French) 38:168-174,1993
References: Kendler, K.S., Gardner, C. O., and Prescott, C.A. "Religion, Psychopathology, and Substance Use and Abuse: A Multimeasure, Genetic-Epidemiologic Study," American Journal of Psychiatry 1997; 154: 322-329. Koenig, Harold G., Larson, David B., and Weaver, Andrew J. "Research on Religion and Serious Mental Illness," in Spirituality and Religion in Recovery from Mental Illness, ed., Roger Fallott. New Directions for Mental Health Services 1998; (80).

 

 

 
 
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National Invisible Chronic Illness Awareness Week ™ is an official annual campaign sponsored by Rest Ministries
in collaboration with other sponsors. All information is Copyrighted, 2008, however, copies can be made and freely distributed as designed for and intended for advocacy partners for the purpose of representing National Invisible Chronic Illness Awareness Week ™. If you have any questions, please email us for clarification.